Getting Started with Query Letters

Posted by April 11th, 2013

Write better query letters.

query

You’ve just finished your full-length novel; the last thing you feel like doing is boiling it down to a letter crafted to entice agents.

But it’s oh-so-important to get it right. A query letter is the one minute you get to pitch your book to an agent. Start with this tutorial on AgentQuery.com.

To learn more about the art of query letter writing, we suggest you do two things:

1. Look at individual agents’ websites and read what they would like to see in a query letter. Start with respected literary agent Rachelle Gardner’s wonderful post How to Write a Query Letter.

2. Now read a ton of real-life examples of query letters that worked. Compare and contrast different approaches, and make sure you have the main components down, even if you choose a different format for your query. Always check each agent’s submissions guidelines for specific instructions and requirements.

Here are a few original queries by now-published authors:

Gail Carriger’s query for her steampunk/paranormal novel SOULLESS

David J. Williams’ query for his science fiction novel THE MIRRORED HEAVENS

Kelly Gay’s query for her urban fantasy novel THE BETTER PART OF DARKNESS
(As you’ll see, this one is from the time our own Colleen was a literary agent.)

Joshua Palmatier’s query for his contemporary fantasy FEVER (this post is part of Palmatier’s Query Project, so scroll down for more examples of queries that worked!)

To ask for feedback for your queries-in-progress on Book Country, post them in the Workshop Your Query area of the discussion forums.

Good luck and happy query writing!

Share Button

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


2 + 2 =