Tag Archives: characterization

Character Development: Creating Unforgettable Characters with Rachel A. Marks

Posted by August 17th, 2015

Darkness-BrutalPlease welcome Book Country member Rachel Anne Marks back to the blog! Rachel’s been a wonderful force of positivity and wisdom here on Book Country for going on three and a half years. We were absolutely thrilled when Rachel announced that Skyscape had picked her up for a 2-book deal. Her young adult debut, DARKNESS BRUTAL, is on sale now. Rachel stopped by the blog this morning to share insights on the incredible character development that keeps her readers coming back for more.

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When we open a book, we begin a journey, and there are several things that help us decide if we’ll keep going. We ask ourselves if we want to hang out in the world of the book, if the questions raised seem interesting, but we also want to follow the lead subject on their journey. As a reader, this is one of my biggest questions when I start reading a novel: do I connect with the main character?

And as a writer, it’s even more important. In order to show a story through the eyes of another, we need to have a strong link to their motives, fears, and conflicts. We need to be almost literally in their shoes if we want the reader to feel that way too. Continue reading

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Member Spotlight: Meet Writer Ellie Isis

Posted by February 3rd, 2014

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Today I am happy to welcome Book Country member Lisa Iriarte, who writes science fiction and fantasy as Ellie Isis. She’s penned several books — many of which well-reviewed on Book Country! — and is currently seeking representation for her work. Her book THREADBARE was recently an Editor’s Pick on Book Country — so be sure to check it out if you’re looking for some original romantic science fiction

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NG: I was impressed to read in your Book Country bio that you try to write a thousand words a day and read a book a week. How do you keep yourself on task?

EI: Hah! The key word in there is “try,” but I do a pretty good job with it. For one thing, I am one of those hyper-organized people. I make to-do lists. Reading and writing are actually on that list, along with chores and such. I go down the list, alternating reading a chapter with doing a chore like laundry, then I write a page on my manuscript and do another chore. Reading and writing end up being rewards to myself for completing other tasks. If I finish all my chores, then I alternate reading and writing for the rest of the day. Of course that doesn’t take into account things like my full-time job, two kids, two dogs, and a husband (they are not on the list :)), so it doesn’t always go according to my grand plan.

NG: You’ve penned four romantic science fiction manuscripts! Tell us more about what draws you to the subgenre and what is, for you, the most important aspect of writing about love in a non-romance  novel?

EI: I’m more character driven than anything else when I write, so the emotional element is vital in any manuscript I work on. When I add a romance in as a subplot, the most important aspects are making sure the balance is right between the romance and the science fiction, and also capturing the feelings/emotions/reactions of the characters in a believable manner. When they suffer from broken hearts, I want my readers to suffer, and when they feel joy, I want my readers to experience that emotion with them.

Continue reading

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