Tag Archives: dutton

Ask an Editor: Jessica Renheim Answers Your Questions!

Posted by August 27th, 2014

http://www.penguin.com/meet/publishers/dutton/Today we present another round of your questions for an editor–this week, answered by Dutton associate editor Jessica Renheim. Jessica has worked with New York Times bestselling authors like Brad Taylor, Dan Savage, Richelle Mead, and Kelley Armstrong. Read on for her advice to members of the Book Country community.

1.  What should a person look for in an editor? (Specifically for ones who will be working closely with you.) Also, should you have your manuscript completely finished before looking into editorial services? – Amber Wolfe

If you’re an aspiring writer who’s interested in traditional book publishing, then the first step is finding a literary agent who can represent your work and connect you with an editor and publisher. There are great sources online like Publishers Marketplace and the Literary Marketplace that can help you research agents and determine individuals who are the right fit for your manuscript; you don’t want to blindly query agents (or editors) who only work on nonfiction if you’ve written a psychological thriller, for example. Find an agent who specializes in the genre you’ve written, who feels passionate about your work, and who can help you find an editor who feels the same way. In terms of manuscript length, literary agents usually have their preferences listed on their websites for how to submit queries and material to them. Continue reading

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Kelley Armstrong on Crossing Genres

Posted by October 16th, 2013

We are so excited to have #1 New York Times bestselling author Kelley Armstrong as our guest. While she’s famous for her Urban Fantasy Otherworld series, in her most recent book Kelley’s produced different fare: what she calls the “contemporary Gothic.” Read about her journey into genre, and about how crossing genres has played a part in her most recent literary brew, OMENS.

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When I decided to wrap up the Otherworld series, the most obvious question was “What will I do next?” I was definitely going to launch another adult series. While I write YA and have recently launched a co-authored middle-grade trilogy, my first love is adult fiction, and I can’t imagine ever giving that up. The question then was “Which genre?” I knew the answer wasn’t urban fantasy. If I wanted to continue that, the Otherworld universe is vast enough that I could tell any story I wanted in it, from any narrative point of view. No, if I left the Otherworld, I was leaving the standard UF genre with it.omens by kelley armstrong

In addition to the Otherworld, I have a straight-up crime/mystery adult series with no fantasy elements. That’s the Nadia Stafford trilogy, wrapping up in November with WILD JUSTICE. I loved writing those books, though I’ll admit I missed the fantasy elements I include in all my other work. The answer seemed obvious then—I would start a series that combines the two. Less paranormal than urban fantasy, but still some element of fantasy, with mystery driving the main plot.

So is OMENS a mystery? Not entirely. I’ve never been good at sticking squarely to any genre. I read most of them, and I want to incorporate many different elements in my work. When I wrote BITTEN, the modern “urban fantasy” genre didn’t exist. There was UF, but the name was used to refer to any fantasy set in the contemporary world. BITTEN was called a supernatural thriller, then paranormal suspense, and finally urban fantasy.

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