Tag Archives: erotic romance

Keeping the Romance “in” Erotic Fiction by Roni Loren

Posted by February 7th, 2014

RoniLorenAuthorHeadshot2With Valentine’s Day just a week away, we’re in a romantic mood. Today, erotic romance writer Roni Loren urges us to create a space in our hearts for erotic fiction. Because erotica can be romantic, too.

***

Often when I tell people I write erotic romance (otherwise known as those books to the general population), I can see what pops into their heads first when they imagine what my books must be about. Sex, sex, and more sex! After all, there is that big glaring “erotic” word to let you know, right?

But it seems they miss the second part of that genre title—romance. I have to hold myself back from saying—wait, no, they’re sexy books, but it’s really about the characters and their journey. Erotic romance and erotic fiction aren’t like adult movies where the supposed “plot” is only there to give scene transitions before the pizza boy and housewife get naked again. Unfortunately, not everybody understands this, and there’s a lot of crappy stuff getting thrown out there and labeled “erotica” by people trying to make a quick buck. (Don’t be one of those people! lol)

Continue reading

Share Button

Upload Your Erotic Fiction to Book Country

Posted by January 29th, 2014

Welcome Writers of Erotic Fiction!

Things have been heating up on Book Country lately, with lots of discussions about writing about sex. Sex is, of course, a constant in contemporary fiction, whether you are trying to write like Philip Roth or E.L. James or somewhere in between. Learning techniques for writing about intimacy, and then having the chutzpah to try these out in your prose, is an important development in many writers’ growth.

That’s why we’ve been inviting erotic fiction authors who we admire to write on our blog, and that’s why we’ve been working hard to introduce writers of erotic fiction to one another via Book Country’s connection features. We’ve been learning a lot about the concerns that come up for writers who write about sex, and we’ve been having a lot of fun reading these steamy genres!

We invite writers of Erotica, Erotic Romance, and all the Romance subgenres to join Book Country and upload your work to share with our community. Book Country is a place where you can get feedback on your steamy manuscript, participate in discussions about how to write in erotic fiction genres with like-minded writers, and best of all, build a community through connecting with those writers, reading their work, and finding your writing voice as erotic fiction continues to grow in popularity with readers around the world. We also have Erotica and Romance shelves in our online Bookstore for when you are ready to publish your erotic fiction. Continue reading

Share Button

“Erotica? Erotic Romance? Steamy Romance?” by Cara McKenna

Posted by January 24th, 2014

LAY IT DOWN cover“What’s the difference between erotica, erotic romance, and just a really steamy romance?” As an author of all three, that’s easily the question I get asked most! Well, aside from, “When are you going to write a sequel to [insert any book featuring a really pushy hero]?”

Unfortunately, there is no single industry definition. You could ask ten different authors and editors and get ten different answers. But you’re asking me, I suppose, so I’ll give you my answer!

First, let’s separate out Erotica from the mix. An erotic story differs from an erotic romance in that it may not feature any romance. Erotica is centered around a sexual journey or episode, one that may or may not feature love or affection or a happily ever after. Erotica offers writers a lot of freedom—it can be just about any sort of story, as long as the spotlight is on the sex. Erotica is designed largely to arouse the reader, and it can deliver on that promise via a wide variety of packages (har.) It may feel like you’re reading about a room full of dynamically slapping body parts, or it could feel exquisitely intimate, with rich character development. But if people fall in love and become attached and devoted to one another by the end? That’s probably an erotic romance.

After HoursSo what’s the difference between an erotic romance, and a romance that simply features a lot of explicit sex?

My short response to that question is to ask you another one: if you took all the love scenes out of a given sexy book, would you still have a story? If the answer is yes, you’re probably talking about a steamy Romance. In most romances, external circumstances (plot) drive the story and the couple’s evolving relationship. The sex will contribute to that evolution, but if you took all the love scenes out, the story wouldn’t collapse.

How about this other sexy book you’re holding—what if you took the plot out? Would the characters’ romantic arc still stand? If you can say yes to that question, you may be in possession of an Erotic Romance. While erotic romances have plots, they can tend to be quieter ones, because the main force driving the characters’ growth and relationship is the sex they explore together. If you take all the sex scenes out of an erotic romance and read what’s left, scene by scene, you would likely feel you were missing something, and wonder why it is these people have gotten so attached to each other. Continue reading

Share Button

Self-publishing COME UNDONE: Author Spotlight with Jessica Hawkins

Posted by January 23rd, 2014

COME UNDONEThank goodness for eBooks! When the power went out at my apartment over a weekend earlier this winter, I’d luckily already downloaded a fantastic book onto my eReader–Book Country member Jessica Hawkins‘s COME UNDONE . The first in a trilogy called They Cityscape Series, COME UNDONE is the story of a young, happily married magazine journalist, Olivia, who finds herself inexplicably but overwhelmingly drawn to a successful, mysterious architect named David.

In fact, instead of me summarizing the book, why don’t I just have you watch the trailer. That’s what sent me straight to buying the book!

Official Book Trailer for the Cityscape Series

I know, right?! Now you see why I ended spending all weekend reading COME UNDONE by the backlight of my eReader! I didn’t even notice when the power came back on.

Anyway, I became an immediate fan of the Cityscape Series and of Jessica, and I wanted to interview her for our Author Spotlight this week because I just love what she’s doing: her books are riveting, and I love the way she’s promoting the books and connecting with fans.

***

LS: Tell us about the amazing Kickstarter campaign you did to support your writing of the Cityscape Series.

JH: Kickstarter ended up being about much more than just meeting a monetary goal. The amount of self-promoting I did was directly related to my success, which would also become true of being a self-published author. I never would’ve raised the money if not for friends and family, so it forced me to say, “Here’s what I’m doing with my life. I’m so committed to this that I’m asking you to bet on me.” Making that declaration was one of the most difficult things I did last year.

As far as the process itself, the best tip I can give, especially in publishing, is to utilize your network. Every dollar I raised came from friends, family or the network I’d been building through self-publishing. Even though I wrote a press release, even though I reached out to crowdfunding sites and my alma mater via e-mail and Twitter, I received hardly any attention outside my immediate network.

I also advise setting aside enough time to prepare, plan and promote your campaign before you launch. It took me about a month to construct a month-long campaign because I was continually revising my delivery and my rewards tiers. Don’t just slap something together and expect people to contribute because it means a lot to you. Show them why you’re worth their hard-earned money.

By the way, all the above advice also applies to self-publishing your books.

teaser for The Cityscape Series

Continue reading

Share Button

Some Like It Hotter: Savanna Fox on Writing Contemporary versus Erotic Romance

Posted by January 22nd, 2014

BoundDirty_comps.inddToday we’re pleased to welcome Berkley Heat author Savanna Fox to Book Country. As someone who writes both contemporary and erotic romance, she knows how to turn up the heat and write steamy love scenes. She’s currently giving away copies of her most recent erotic romance, BOUND TO BE DIRTY, so head out to her site for a chance to snag a copy!

Savanna’s here to talk about the differences in her approach to writing in the two romance subgenres. 

Take it away, Savanna!

***

If you read romance fiction, I bet you’ve noticed that it’s getting hotter. That trend started even before Fifty Shades of Grey made BDSM erotic romance standard reading fare on subways and in airport waiting rooms.

I’ve been writing “hot” ever since 2005, though not with the level of kink found in many erotic romances. For me, it’s all about one man, one woman, and, to be honest, nothing I wouldn’t want to try myself!

The level of heat in my books varies. As Susan Fox, I write sexy contemporaries for Kensington Zebra. My Caribou Crossing series is set in a small Western town made for adventure, love, and second chances. As Savanna Fox, I write erotic romance for Berkley Heat. My Dirty Girls Book Club series, set in Vancouver, British Columbia, is about four women whose book club decides to spice things up by reading erotica. Each time they do, a member embarks on a sexy romance that in some ways parallels the story they’re reading.

For me, it’s natural to not close the bedroom door in the reader’s face. What happens during sex—and what the characters think and feel—is as important, and often more important, than what happens when they’re together outside the bedroom.

Continue reading

Share Button

Beyond NaNoWriMo: Literary Agent Sara Megibow on Top Publishing Trends

Posted by December 4th, 2013

NaNoWriMo has come to an end, and I’m sure many of you are itching to share your work: publish it or place it into the hand of a literary agent. Finishing a novel is incredibly exciting, but make sure it’s as ready as it can be, first, before sharing it with your readers! Do your research. Edit. Strategize. 

Today we have the third part of our interview with agent Sara Megibow–a special treat for those of you who are gearing up to query agents in the next months. Be sure to check out the first part of our interview, in which she shared specific query advice and the second part, where she talked about what’s behind a good author-agent relationship

Here, we discuss publishing trends, erotic romance, and sci/fi submissions. ~NG

NG: As an agent, you have a birds-eye view of the publishing industry. Are there any trends you see growing or contracting in terms of genre or writing style?

SM: That’s a great question and thanks again for having me here at Book Country! I’ve followed the Book Country website and Twitter feed for a long time now. Thanks for all the hard work your team does to support authors!

Now, on to trends—you asked about genre and writing style. Let’s tackle genre first. I’ve worked in publishing for 8 years and have been a literary agent for 4 years and can honestly say (from an agent’s perspective) brilliant writing has been the “hot” thing all along. It’s easy to point to certain genres that have gone “boom” and been hot over the years—vampire romance, young adult dystopian, erotic romance, etc. but when I’m reading submissions for potential representation I put these biases aside and read solely for quality of writing. I want a book that grabs my attention and draws me in so much that when the cat meows, the kid screams and the doorbell rings, I miss it all because I’m so engrossed in the characters and their lives.

9780778313533_smp.inddAs an agent, I represent debut authors in science fiction, fantasy, romance, erotica, new adult, young adult and middle grade fiction. I do want submissions that match a certain formula based on genre (word count, happy-ever-after ending, etc), but I don’t reject submissions because of the genre itself. I’ve seen a lot of submissions recently set in the dream world or in Heaven or Hell and I’ve also seen a lot of submissions in which the hero or heroine is recovering from a coma or from amnesia. That doesn’t mean I wouldn’t represent a book with these elements—it just means a book with these elements will have to display superior mastery of craft in order to stand out among the competition.

Here’s another example—I’ve heard whispered around the internets that historical romance is on a downswing. Well, I disagree. I agree that contemporary romance is trending up right now, but not at the expense of historical as people might say. I represent debut author Ashlyn Macnamara who has two Regency historicals out this year and they are selling like hotcakes. So, genre being what it is—we have to take these trends with a grain of salt.

Now, let’s talk about writing style for a moment. In terms of trends, writing style has a much more concrete answer than genre. For example, here are some quantifiable success stories from the past two years:

The eBook tie-in novella. Think about SUBMIT TO DESIRE by Tiffany Reisz—a novella-length story set in her ORIGINAL SINNERS world but sold at a lower price and as an ebook only. SUBMIT TO DESIRE sells well and readers seem to love the occasional quickie read, especially when they get to see some of their favorite heroes and heroines again. Also, the lower price point works well in convincing new readers to try an author she/he might not have read before. We recently inked an ebook novella tie-in deal for Michael Underwood’s GEEKOMANCY series too. The novella will be called ATTACK THE GEEK, will feature Ree Reyes in a new adventure and will be available as an ebook in early 2014. Will this trend continue? Yes, I think it will.

Continue reading

Share Button