Tag Archives: M/M Romance

Share your LGBTQ Writing on Book Country

Posted by June 20th, 2014

share your GLBT Writing on Book CountryWe celebrate LGBTQ writing all year round, of course, but during Pride Month we want to take a minute to highlight the areas of our Genre Map that especially focus on LGBTQ themes: F/F Romance, M/M Romance, and Young Adult LGBTQ.

Curious to learn more about these growing genres? Eager to share and get feedback on your LGBTQ writing from a community of like-minded writers? Join us on Book Country. It’s a safe and supportive space to develop writing with LGBTQ themes, no matter what genre you write.

Introduce yourself to the community here!

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“Why I Write M/M Romance” by Z.A. Maxfield

Posted by February 12th, 2014

The following is a guest post by romance writer Z.A. Maxfield, who writes gay romances for InterMix/Penguin and whose first The Cowboys novel MY COWBOY HEART has us completely captivated. 

My-Heartache-Cowboy

The second The Cowboys novel, MY HEARTACHE COWBOY, came out on January 21st!

I’m probably the very last person who should tackle the subject of writing M/M Romance because writing gay romance wasn’t really a conscious decision on my part. I’ve always wanted to write in the romance genre, and m/m stories were simply the stories that spoke to my heart when I took on my kids’ playful challenge to write my first full-length novel.

From the very beginning, I felt I had a responsibility to eschew stereotypes and tell a realistic story within the confines of the romance genre. I have always seen romance as a form of fantasy. If romance novels were based on reality, there would be more characters waking up in pools of drool with bad bedhead. They’d have morning breath that could peel the paint off a car.

While romance is fantasy, the emotional lives of its characters must resonate for the reader as true. The best romances have high emotional stakes, good tension, and the breathless wonder of passionate love.

That’s what I was reading romance for, at any rate.

I went into my stories believing I should avoid relying on coming-out drama and homophobia as my main plot points—although these are facts of life for the LGBT community—because my goal was always to write a romance novel featuring a protagonist and a love interest who just happen to be gay, rather than to make the story about being gay.

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