Tag Archives: Publishing Process

Jaycee Ford Publishes WATCHING FIREFLIES!

Posted by August 18th, 2014

Watching FirefliesWe are so excited for Book Country member Jaycee Ford! Tomorrow she is publishing her first book, WATCHING FIREFLIES. We are so proud that workshopping the book on Book Country was a part of her amazing journey.

***

Since I was young, I always knew that I wasn’t exactly bred for a normal life, but my life was like every other kid. I grew up and went to college. I partook in all of the normal college things, but there was something that I just didn’t know. I graduated in History because I loved History. I got married in my mid-twenties. I got a dog. I loved my life, but life was still … normal. Something was missing.

One Saturday, my husband was out fishing, and I was reading most likely my hundredth book of year. We were being normal. I didn’t finish the book and couldn’t tell you what it was. I pushed myself off of the sofa and turned on my computer. I sat in front of a blank Word doc and a blinking cursor. In that moment, I became a seat of your pants writer. I didn’t know it then, but my publishing journey had begun.

What! Continue reading

Share Button

The Book Publishing Journey: Interview with Senior Editor Beena Kamlani

Posted by August 15th, 2014

Hope you are enjoying Ask an Editor Month on Book Country! Watch this interview with Senior Editor Beena Kamlani of Viking Penguin Random House. Beena explains her role as a developmental editor and how she guides the author in the editing process. You can also watch an expanded version of this interview.

Share Button

Waiting to Be Discovered Books on Book Country

Posted by August 14th, 2014

Book Country Waiting to Be Discovered

A new set of Waiting to Be Discovered books is featured on the Read and Review page!

Every time we update the Waiting to Be Discovered carousel, we are always blown away by the diverse array of books we feature. All thanks to you! Here is a list of our Waiting to Be Discovered books: Continue reading

Share Button

Ask an Editor: Melissa Danaczko Answers Your Questions!

Posted by August 12th, 2014

Ask an EditorWelcome to Part II of Book Country’s Ask an Editor series! Melissa Danaczko is an Editor at Doubleday, an imprint of Penguin Random House. Today, she talks about how to improve dialogue in writing, how marketability plays a role in selecting books for publication, and how editors deal with personal bias. Read Part I of Ask an Editor.

***

1.  Is there bias when editing? When editors get content which violates them personally, does it affect their work? – Melanie Kilsby () Continue reading

Share Button

Ask an Editor: Brian S. Geffen Answers Your Questions!

Posted by August 5th, 2014

Brian S. GeffenThank you so much for submitting questions for Book Country’s Ask an Editor blog series! Brian S. Geffen, Assistant Editor at Philomel Books, discusses what a typical day is like for him, and whether the editing process differs between new writers and seasoned writers. 

***

1.  What is a typical day like? – Anni Eayrs

The different tasks really vary week-to-week for an editor—though the answer is a bit cliché, it’s true. The work may consist of reading manuscript submissions from agents, editing contracted manuscripts (both line editing and conceptual editing), writing copy of all sorts (jacket copy; title information sheets that provide background on upcoming titles for the Marketing, Publicity, and Sales teams; catalog copy to introduce new books to booksellers), working with designers on interior and jacket design concepts, negotiating contract terms with agents and foreign publishers, and keeping informed about the general world of children’s publishing beyond one’s own publishing house. It’s easy to get engrossed in one’s own work, but it’s very necessary to be on the pulse and know what else is out there in the wider publishing world. I’m also the assistant to the Publisher of Philomel so I help out with some of the administrative tasks of the imprint as well. The varied workload really allows me to exercise different forms of creative thinking, and I find it very enjoyable and fulfilling. Continue reading

Share Button

THE THORN OF DENTONHILL by Marshall Maresca: Cover Reveal and What “Done” Really Means

Posted by August 4th, 2014

Longtime Book Country member Marshall Maresca is back on the blog today to unveil the gorgeous cover for his first book, THE THORN OF DENTONHILL, which was workshoppped in the Book Country community and was picked up for publication by DAW Books. The book will go on sale in February 2015.

We are very excited about this! Congratulations, Marshall!

THE THORN OF DENTONHILL cover

The gorgeous cover for THE THORN OF DENTONHILL by Book Country member Ryan Maresca. Read on to hear about what it’s like to finally be “done” with the manuscript.

“Done” is a tricky word in this business.

By which I mean, I was “done” with THE THORN OF DENTONHILL—the rough draft of it—in September 2008. Of course, that’s just a rough draft, so that isn’t done. Really, a year later, I had finished my edits and was querying to agents. Then it was “done”. Continue reading

Share Button

Submit Questions for our Ask an Editor Series!

Posted by July 28th, 2014


Book Country Ask an EditorThank you to all those who submitted questions for our Ask an Agent blog series! Your questions touched on a lot of topics including how to query agents and how agents actually go about choosing manuscripts. Thanks to the literary agents who helped make Ask an Agent possible! You can find links to their blog posts below.

This August, we are launching our Ask an Editor blog series! As you know, editors decide which manuscripts they would like to publish. Editors are involved in virtually every step of the publishing process, from the actual editing to marketing and promotion. Continue reading

Share Button

Judging a Book by Its Cover: What Copy Is and Why You Should Care by Julianne Clancy

Posted by July 25th, 2014

Copywriting- Julianne Clancy

Just a few of the titles Julianne has worked on!

I am a copywriter. This is not to be confused with a copyeditor (who makes sure the gods of grammar are not angered) or a copyrighter (which I don’t think is a real thing, but I assume would be someone who enforces copyright law). I’m the person who writes what’s on the covers of books and retailer websites. Continue reading

Share Button

Finding an Agent: What No One Wants to Talk About by Arna Bontemps Hemenway

Posted by July 11th, 2014

As a writer and professor of Creative Writing, what I get asked about most is finding an agent. I struggle to answer for a couple of reasons: namely, that there are only two things of worth I have to say on the matter of finding an agent, and because both of them are pretty awkward to say out loud.

Arna Hemenway 2

Arna Bontemps Hemenway poses with his book ELEGY ON KINDERKLAVIER, which comes out from Sarabande Books on Tuesday, July 15th.

Before I get to those two pieces of wisdom, let me start by reiterating what you’ve probably already heard about finding an agent: You should take the time and effort to make your query effective and professional. You shouldn’t sign with an agent you’re afraid of (as the novelist Ethan Canin once memorably put it to me, “you shouldn’t need an agent to call your agent”) or one you can’t talk to or one who seems like they won’t answer your calls if you’re not successful. You want somebody who’s smart and effective enough to make good business decisions for you, but also somebody who seems like a basically good person. Pay attention to your gut. Be ready to get rejected over and over and over and over and over again.

Now we’ve got that good advice out of the way, here’s the first thing no one particularly wants to say or hear about finding an agent: agents are not important. Let me repeat that: the literary agent is not important. No offense. Continue reading

Share Button

How BookBub Helped My Books Sell by Therese Walsh

Posted by July 9th, 2014

the moon sisters“It’s sort of miraculous,” one of my author friends said late last year of BookBub, a website/newsletter used to promote quality e-books with temporarily (and drastically) slashed prices. She had moved from traditional publishing into the world of hybrid-publishing—still accepting contracts with publishers but self-publishing older books that had gone out of print. When she decided to run a sale on one of her self-published books, decreasing the price from $4.99 to $1.99 for a few weeks, she contacted BookBub and was accepted for inclusion in a one-day email promotion. Sales increased once the price of her book dropped, she said, but truly spiked once BookBub’s e-blast reached its subscribers. The benefits didn’t end there; her numbers remained boosted for months after the end of the sale, and she began to sell more of her other novels as well. “It’s a whole new world,” she said.

I’d heard from other friends about the potential impact of BookBub, too, and so when my publisher decided to put the eBook of my latest novel on sale and utilize BookBub to get the word out to over 500k women’s fiction readers, I took a keen interest in the event. Sales for the eBook of THE MOON SISTERS had never really taken off. Though I didn’t hawk over my numbers, the best ranking I’d noticed on Amazon was in the range of 10k for the e-book. Nook numbers were similarly meh at Barnes and Noble. If the $10.99 price point—standard for an eBook when the bookshelf-book is a hard cover—repelled the e-book audience, would the $1.99 sale make a difference, and if so, how much of a difference?

BookBub1

May rolled around, and the two-week sale of the e-version of THE MOON SISTERS began. Though the BookBub announcement wouldn’t release until midway through the sale, word-of-mouth (and Facebook and Twitter) did a lot, and numbers quickly improved on the sales front. The day before the BookBub, numbers for the eBook of THE MOON SISTERS on Barnes and Noble were in the 900 range, and were in the 2k range on Amazon; a huge improvement.

I woke early the morning of the BookBub promotion and turned on my computer, full of anticipation. But nothing significant had changed. “Hang in there,” a friend coached. “My BookBub email hasn’t even arrived yet, and it’ll take a while for sales numbers to be reflected online, too.” Her reassurances made perfect sense, but I did spend a few hours wondering if I’d become the anomaly.

And then, boom. Continue reading

Share Button