Tag Archives: The Penguin Press

Writing About War and Military Service: A Q&A with Phil Klay

Posted by May 23rd, 2014

RedeploymentOne of the absolute best books I’ve read this year is Phil Klay‘s debut short story collection REDEPLOYMENT, now out from The Penguin Press. Addictively readable and full of searing, uncomfortable imagery and detail, these stories take us on an unforgettable journey through the Iraq war as it is experienced and remembered by those fighting in it. You can learn so much about writing about war from Phil–his is a book I will be thinking about a lot as we celebrate Memorial Day this weekend.

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Lucy Silag:  Why do you think that so few literary writers have written about the war in Iraq from the perspective of those fighting it? 

Phil Klay: There are a few civilian writers who have written about the military, like Ben Fountain, Lea Carpenter, and Roxana Robinson. I think to do it right takes a lot of time and research. Plus, there’s the old cultural trope that you can’t know about war unless you were there. I don’t think that’s true, but perhaps that steers people away. If so that’s unfortunate, since I think we need thoughtful engagement with the wars from both civilians and veterans alike.  Continue reading

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The Perfect Antidote to Writer’s Block: Reading!

Posted by October 8th, 2013

When you have writer’s block, is it okay to read instead of write?

I liked what Book Country members had to say in response to Molly‘s recent post on the “How do you break out of writer’s block?” thread. Atthys Gage reassured Molly that reading “cannot help but make you a better writer,” and Carl E. Reed expanded the list of acceptable procrastination techniques to include “cooking, physical exercise, dreaming . . . Everything is grist for the mill when you’re a writer.”

Molly, Atthys, and Carl are onto something. In the book WE WANTED TO BE WRITERS: Life, Love, and Literature at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Michelle Huneven (with whom I studied in graduate school) says that she starts the writing day by reading “something–usually fiction I admire–until I get itchy and want to make fiction myself.” Over the weekend, I tried this, spending a big chunk of time relaxing with a few historical novels. I felt guilty reading instead of writing, but by Sunday evening, I’d not only read two really fabulous books, I’d also logged 5,000 words on my WIP. Not bad!

Ella Berthoud and Susan ElderkinBibliotherapists Ella Berthoud and Susan Elderkin definitely endorse reading as a cure–and not just for writer’s block. THE NOVEL CURE is their compendium of books-as-cures for all manner of ailments: low self-esteem, unemployment, and, of course, writer’s block. The authors recommend I CAPTURE THE CASTLE (by Dodie Smith) for ridding yourself of writer’s block. Here’s why they chose it:

The remedy for writer’s block inflicted upon the novelist father in I CAPTURE THE CASTLE is nothing short of genius. But–darn it–to tell it would be to give away one of the plot twists in the unutterably charming novel. Mortmain, as he is known by his second wife, Topaz, achieved great critical success with an experimental novel called Jacob Wrestling. But he has not been able to put pen to paper since an unfortunately incident involving a next-door neighbor who foolishly intervened when Mortmain brandished a cake knife at his first wife while they were having tea in the garden. He ended up spending three months behind bars, writer’s block set in, and the family has been penniless ever since.

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