Tag Archives: tips and advice

VIDEO: 5 Golden Rules of Social Media for Authors

Posted by November 23rd, 2015

Watch now: Book Country member Andrea Dunlop, social media and marketing director for Girl Friday Productions and author of the novel LOSING THE LIGHT, shares the 5 Golden Rules of Social Media for Authors.

5 Golden Rules of Social Media for Authors

1. If you’re an author, marketing is part of your job.
2. Marketing is all about community.
3. Consistency is key.
4. Check your karma.
5. Do what you like.

Go here to learn more about how Girl Friday Productions works with authors like you, and check out more videos on the BookCountryTV YouTube channel.

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When Your Book Promotion Idea Fails–Miranda Beverly-Whittemore, Author of the New York Times Bestseller BITTERSWEET

Posted by June 9th, 2015

When Your Promotional Idea Fails - Miranda Beverly-Whittemore, Author of Bestseller BITTERSWEETMiranda Beverly-Whittemore is the author of BITTERSWEET, the New York Times Bestseller that exposes the gothic underbelly of an idyllic world of privilege and an outsider’s hunger to belong. All New York Times Bestsellers have great marketing behind them. But Miranda shares one book promotion idea that didn’t take off and what she learned from the undertaking.

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When Crown bought my third novel, BITTERSWEET, in the spring of 2013, I decided to dedicate the year before publication to promotion. There were a lot of necessary (if unexciting) fixes to my author platform, from revitalizing an outdated website, to relaunching a defunct newsletter, to overcoming my shyness on social media. But my main promotional idea was something that enticed me: a website where women could share stories of the ups and downs of their girlhood friendships.

The driving force in BITTERSWEET is a passionate, dark friendship between college roommates Mabel and Ev. I’ve always been intrigued by that particular era in any female life before adulthood when the loves (and heartbreaks, and envies) of our lives are other girls. As I mentioned the book’s premise to friends and colleagues, a funny thing happened: these women would spontaneously share stories of their own complicated friendships. I heard tales of being saved from something perilous, of being unnecessarily cruel, of never getting to say goodbye when a best friend moved away. I was inundated with these beautiful, sad, funny stories, and I wanted to make a home for them. FriendStories.com was born. Continue reading

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Ask a Literary Agent: Nephele Tempest Answers Your Questions!

Posted by May 27th, 2015

Ask a Literary Agent: Nephele Tempest Answers Your Questions!We’re happy to have literary agent Nephele Tempest share her experience with the Book Country community! Nephele has been a member of The Knight Agency since 2005 and is based in Los Angeles. Nephele is currently seeking works in a wide variety of genres, including literary fiction, romance, and young adult.

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If you feel that a novel from a first-time author is strong (style, voice, premise, etc.) — but, could use some changes (more than simple tweaking) — are you likely to say to the author: Make these changes and then send it back to me? – Val

I have definitely done this in the past, but it’s the exception rather than the rule. If I really love a story concept and think the writing is strong, I will occasionally make a few suggestions to the author with an offer to reread if they decide to follow up. Not everyone takes my suggestions, but I have seen revised manuscripts in this way. On one occasion, I did end up signing the author. We did a few more rounds of revisions once I had signed her on before I submitted the book to editors and sold it. The first round of edits she performed before I signed her on showed me that she was capable of following directions and that she was willing to work to get the book to a salable point. These are great qualities to see in a client.

As a member of the Book Country community of writers, I have a manuscript (Historical Fiction/Personage) that lately has been receiving five nib (star) reviews. The book is virtually finished, but I am in a quandary as to whether to seek an agent or self-publish. I have worked on this story for many years, and it is the advice from other writers that has helped me bring the novel to this point. – Rob Emery

Only you can decide whether you are interested in going the traditional publishing route or if you want to self-publish. Each route has its advantages and disadvantages. The traditional route can be time-consuming, but you end up with a group of people working for you to help get your book into the world — an agent, an editor, a marketing department and sales team, etc. If you self-publish, you still need those people and will need to find them and pay them for their work. I recommend you research both ways of doing things and pick the route that seems best for you. Either way, give the process time to work. Commit to the choice you make and really put in the time and effort to make your book a success. Too often I receive queries from authors who have self-published a few months ago and aren’t happy with the results, so they now want to try again the traditional way. I can’t really do anything for them because all they’ve done is create a poor sales history for their project that will make it hard for me to sell to a publishing house. So whatever route you choose, give it your all. Continue reading

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10 Tips for a Great Author Facebook Page

Posted by September 3rd, 2014

Book Country

For better or for worse social media plays a major role in how authors interact with readers, keeping existing fans engaged between book releases as well as building new audiences.  Facebook in particular is a constantly changing and often challenging platform. Courtney Landi, Associate Publicist at Berkley/NAL, shares ten tips for a great author Facebook Page.

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Attention Grabbing Content: When posting on Facebook, images are a great way to engage your fans!  Whenever possible, post a photo or a link with available thumbnails, in order to catch people’s attention.  Not only are images eye catching, but Facebook algorithms also prioritize posts with images in the News Feed over posts without.  *Additional Trick: one of the benefits of the Facebook Page application is that you can replace a subpar link image—the standard image provided along with a link—with your own image.  Take advantage of that trick when necessary.                                                                                    Continue reading

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