Tag Archives: Twitter Chat

Countdown to Kerry Schafer’s BETWEEN

Posted by January 18th, 2013

Join us to celebrate Book Country betafish and Penguin author Kerry Schafer and the release of her first book!

kerry_and_betweenBack in January of 2012, we announced the spectacular news that Book Country member and original beta user Kerry Schafer had been offered a two-book deal with Penguin’s science fiction and fantasy imprint Ace. Kerry’s debut novel, the urban fantasy BETWEEN, was workshopped on Book Country, where it captured the attention of Berkley editorial director Susan Allison. To get the full scoop about Kerry’s path to publication, click here for the USA Today story.

Now, finally, the book hits the shelves in only 11 days—on January 29th!

My colleague Colleen and I got our own copies of BETWEEN in the mail yesterday (and yes, we did do a happy dance), and today we wanted to take a moment to celebrate Kerry’s success and her book’s release.

CONGRATULATIONS, KERRY!

We’ll be hosting a Twitter chat with Kerry soon to talk about her book and her unusual pathway to publication, and we’ll be giving away copies to five lucky readers!  Follow our announcements on Twitter @BookCountry for more details.

UPDATE: The Twitter chat will be on Tuesday, February 5 at 9 PM EST. Join us!

BETWEEN tells the story of the intrepid ER doctor-turned-dreamshifter Vivian Maylor. Shuttled into a world between dream and reality, she has to guard the doorways separating the two. If she fails, all hell will break loose and magical creatures–deadly dragons–will spill into the physical world. (And I think it’s only fitting that there is a random penguin following Vivian from one reality to the other.)

If haunting, well-written prose and a smart, strong female lead are your cup of tea, then you’ll love BETWEEN.

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Vivian Maylor can’t sleep. Maybe it’s because she just broke up with her boyfriend and moved to a new town, or it could be the stress of her new job at the hospital. But perhaps it’s because her dreams have started to bleed through into her waking hours.

All of her life Vivian has rejected her mother’s insane ramblings about Dreamworlds for concrete science and fact, until an emergency room patient ranting about dragons spontaneously combusts before her eyes—forcing Viv to consider the idea that her visions of mythical beasts might be real.

And when a chance encounter leads her to a man she knows only from her dreams, Vivian finds herself falling into a world that seems strange and familiar all at once—a world where the line between dream and reality is hard to determine, and hard to control…

You can keep up with Kerry and her progress with the second in the Books of the Between, WAKEWORLD, at her website: http://www.kerryschafer.com. Kerry Schafer is represented by Deidre Knight of The Knight Agency.

Photo courtesy of the author

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Light a Fire Under Your Characters

Posted by August 11th, 2012

Book Country Twitter Chat (August 11, 2011)

Find out what bestselling author Karen Hawkins and “Smart Bitches, Trashy Books” blogger Sarah Wendell have to say about chemistry between characters.

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 One of the main things that draws a reader into a romance novel–or any novel really!–is the chemistry between the characters. Whether it’s a hero and a heroine, a protagonist and an antagonist, or a main character and a secondary character, the sparks should fly off the page. But it’s not as simple as it sounds to achieve! So how do you create that tension, that fire? And what even constitutes chemistry really?

Book Country turned to the pros for some wise and entertaining answers: Karen Hawkins(@theKarenHawkins) and Sarah Wendell (@smartbitches).

Karen is the New York Times bestselling author of historical and contemporary romance novels. Her characters, no matter what the time period, always sizzle and burn white hot!

Sarah is a reviewer, blogger, and author who runs the popular romance blogSmart Bitches, Trashy Books. Her taste is impeccable and she can smell the fire between characters from miles away. These ladies know their stuff!

Just check out these highlights:

@SmartBitches: Examples of no chemistry: People who end up together simply because they are the hero and heroine. YAWNNNN.

@TheKarenHawkins: You should thread the evidence of this chemistry through the book, and not dump in one place.

@Chumplet: Instant attraction doesn’t fly these days. Readers want to see deeper nuances than merely the physical.

@mamajalapa: tension will always exist in some form even after h/h are together. It’s human nature. How they deal w/it makse chemistry.

@SmartBitches: My fave: “I don’t want to like you, I don’t want to like you, I can’t stop thinking about your hair DAMMIT!” That’s chemistry.

@TheKarenHawkins: Villains w/depth – a real person – means they can be redeemed and that true chemistry is about POSSIBILITIES.

@anneholly2010: The ones that can’t live without each other are unrealistic and creepy. Co-dependence is not sweet.

@younglibrarian: clue #1 your story has gone off rails: your mc’s have more chemistry w/secondary characters than bet each other

If you missed the chat or want to remind yourself, we’ve posted the entire transcript as a PDF document here. The PDF will open in your browser and you’ll be able to save it to your computer if you like. You can also get to know your fellow genre fiction lovers by clicking directly on their Twitter handles.

Please note that the chat appears from newest to oldest tweets, so start at the bottom and work your way up.

Thanks to all who made this chat such a great success!

REMEMBER: Book Country Twitter chats occur every other Thursday night from 9-10 pm EST. Just use the hashtag #bookcountry to participate or follow along. Topics are announced in advance in the Book Country Discussion forums, so be sure to take a look!

 

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Book Packaging: Another Way to Get Published

Posted by March 22nd, 2012

Book Country Twitter Chat (March 15, 2012)

Learn about the ins and outs of book packaging from experts of Stonesong agency, Ellen Scordato, Alison Fargis, and Judith Linden.

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What is book packaging?! It has nothing to do with literally packaging a physical book. It is an alternative way to get published, also known as book development. Book packagers may be enigmatic figures to laymen, but any industry insider will tell you that they play a fundamental role in the book world!

As one of our guests Alison Fargis told us, the book packager is like an independent film producer, in charge of doing everything that has to do with putting a book together — working with writers and publishers on a project management level, offering comprehensive editorial, design, and production work, as well as marketing and PR. Book packagers help publishers execute difficult or crash projects. Or they come up with their own idea for a book and hire writers who bring the concept to life.

How does this pertain to YOU? Well, the book packaging industry employs a ton of freelance writers and publishing professionals. It is a great way to break into the biz and get writing credits. Our special guests to tell us more are the ladies of Stonesong, a NYC-based literary, publishing, and book development agency — Ellen Scordato (@EScordato), Alison Fargis ( @AlisonFargis), and Judith Linden ( @JudyLinden1) — mostly package non-fiction.

Ellen Scordato is a book packager who handles production, design and custom publishing, and has a quarter century of in-depth publishing experience. She used to be a managing editor who loved production and midwifing great ideas, and it is the passion for project management that got her into book packaging.

Alison Fargishas 17 years of packaging and book development experience. She often puts on a literary agent hat, representing clients such as bestselling author of The Sisters Grimm, Michael Buckley. In 2002, Alison and Ellen co-founded Stonesong.

Judith Linden joined Ellen and Alison at Stonesong in 2004 as Executive VP, Literary Agent, and Director of Digital and Print Media. Prior to joining Stonesong, Judith spent nearly 20 years as an executive editor and book developer at two major publishing houses.

Together, they have produced many bestselling titles, including The Daring Book for GirlsDating the Undead, and Smart Words. With 75 years of combined editorial and packaging experience, they are a treasure trove of pub insight! Here’s a taste:

@JudyLinden1: Basically we [book packagers] are agents plus. We follow a project from inception to final form. For PETFINDER [a book about adopting shelter dogs], we found the org, wrote proposal, sold it, edited every word, managed photos, delivered ms to pub.

@EScordato: We don’t have writers on staff. We compose teams specifically for each project, depending on the expertise needed.Suppose we a book on culinary history or a craft book. We might look for writers who have blogs on the subject, or teach on it.

@AlisonFargis: We also look for writers for the crash projects publishers send our way.

@JudyLinden1: [Biggest subjects in non-fiction book packaging right now] cooking, design, lifestyle, diet, relationships, pop psychology, pop culture, fashion, parenting among others.

@EScordato: Yes! We certainly are [considering every delivery medium]. Very active in developing ebooks.

@AlisonFargis: I keep resumes for years. I may not have a gig for u right now but if the right project comes along I will call.

If you missed the chat or want to refresh your memory, we’ve posted the entire transcript as a PDF document HERE. The PDF will open in your browser and you’ll be able to save it to your computer if you like. You can also get to know your fellow genre fiction lovers by clicking directly on their Twitter handles.

Please note that the chat appears from newest to oldest tweets, so start at the bottom and work your way up.

Thanks to all of our chat participants!

REMEMBER: Book Country Twitter chats are taking a short hiatus, but typically occur every other Thursday. Just use the hashtag #bookcountry to participate or follow along. Dates, topics, and special guests are announced in advance in the Book Country Discussion forums, so be sure to take a look! And follow us on Twitter @Book_Country.

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Grammar: It’s Important!

Posted by March 8th, 2012

Book Country Twitter Chat (March 1, 2012)

Every writer needs to know the basics. That’s why Grammar gurus Mignon Fogarty, Patricia O’Conner, and Stewart Kellerman gave us a little lesson.

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Most people don’t like it. Some people are obsessed with it. But all writers need to know it….Grammar. It’s not just for copyeditors! Incorrect grammar and punctuation can change the meaning of your words. It can change everything.

That’s why we asked Mignon Fogarty (@GrammarGirl) and the writing duo Patricia T O’Conner and Stewart Kellerman(@Grammarphobia) to join us for a Twitter chat and talk about some common grammar mistakes and answer your grammar questions.

To give you a little background on our experts, Mignon is the founder/host of “Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing.” She does posts, podcasts, the works to help people improve their writing by going back to the basics. Patricia and Stewarthave co-written a number of beloved writing guides, including the Grammar “bible” Woe is I and writing guide Words Fail Me.

Here’s are some of the chat’s highlights (You can view the entire transcript using the link following):

@GrammarGirl: Subject-verb agreement is impoartant and can be tricky. For example, people get confused by joining words such as “in addition to.” It can  make a subject sound plural when it’s not.

@Grammarphobia:  [There’s] nothing wrong with using a preposition at the end of a sentence. That’s a notorious myth.

@JonathanDalar: I always think of semicolors as dividing joined sentences of similar thought; it seems to work well for that.

@GrammarGirl: Sometimes a sentence needs a “that” to avoid a misreading: Aardvark maintains THAT Squiggly’s yard is too large.

@Grammarphobia: Creative writing doesn’t justify limp, flabby writing.

@asalinguist: My students constantly say “amount” intead of “number of” something for count and non-count alike

@GrammarGirl: I met someone once who worked on Word’s grammar checker. He said he was sorry.

@grammarphobia: Punctuation is supposed to make reading easy and writing more natural. Lack of punctuation can be bewildering.

If you missed the chat or want to remind yourself, we’ve posted the entire transcript as a PDF document here. The PDF will open in your browser and you’ll be able to save it to your computer if you like. You can also get to know your fellow genre fiction lovers by clicking directly on their Twitter handles.

Remember though that the chat appears from newest to oldest tweets, so start at the end of the PDF and work your way up to page 1.

Thanks to everyone who participated in this lively discussion!

REMEMBER: Book Country Twitter chats occur every other Thursday night from 9-10 pm EST. Just use the hashtag #bookcountry to participate or follow along. Topics are announced in advance in the Book Country Discussion forums, so be sure to take a look! And follow us on Twitter: @Book_Country.

 

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Screenwriting VS Novel-writing

Posted by February 16th, 2012

Book Country Twitter Chat (February 9, 2012)

Ever think about trying to write a screenplay? We chatted with screenwriters Doug Richardson and Jeanne Veillette Bowerman to get some tips.

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For a novelist, trying new techniques, styles, genres, and the like is imperative. It’s how we learn and grow and find our voice. But it can also be helpful to try writing in different mediums, like drafting a screenplay, for example. Whether you try your hand by adapting your already-existing prose into a script or starting fresh, the process of screenwriting is very different than that of novel-writing. You have less room to play with subplot, with specific discriptors, and more of your focus is on dialogue and scene. Screenwriting forces a writer to get to the heart of the story quicker, more clearly, and with greater punch, perhaps, than other mediums.

To get a closer look at the screenwriting versus novel-writing process, we asked Doug Richardson (@byDougRich) and Jeanne Veillette Bowerman (@JeanneVB) to chat with us on Twitter.

Doug went to the USC Film School to learn the ropes, and then shot to success by writing films such as DIE HARD 2, BAD BOYS, WELCOME TO MOOSEPORT, and HOSTAGE. He’s also written a number of novels, including DARK HORSE and TRUE BELIEVERS. His experience and expertise is vast and valuable!

Jeanne spends a great deal of her time educating writers on screenwriting, in addition to writing herself (she recently wrote the film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book SLAVERY BY ANOTHER NAME!). She writes a monthly Balls of Steel column for Script Magazine and co-founded the weekly twitter screenwriter chat, #Scriptchat.

Here are some gems from the lively chat–you can also get the full transcript below:

@jeannevb: The hardest part [of adapting a novel to film] is the descriptors. In screenplays you cannot write anything that can’t be seen on screen. NO thoughts

@byDougRich: In book you can say “he stared into the void.” In a movie, it’s how big is the void, what color, how  many carpenters to build?

@MJLucey: This is a hard buisness. It isn’t eacy for those under 40 either. Being older means you have more to write about.

@jeannevb: fyi, it’s MUCH harder to get an agent as a screenwriter than a novelist. Just a reality.

@byDougRich: Screenwriting is about being efficient and getting to the point. Not much time to linger when blowing up sh*t.

@debhoudekrule: Scriptwriting format is pretty simple. Rethinking story structure and characterizations to visuals is more significant change.

If you missed the chat or want to remind yourself, we’ve posted the entire transcript as a PDF document here. The PDF will open in your browser and you’ll be able to save it to your computer if you like. You can also get to know your fellow genre fiction lovers by clicking directly on their Twitter handles.

Remember though that the chat appears from newest to oldest tweets, so start at the end of the PDF and work your way up to page 1.

Thanks to everyone who participated in this awesome discussion!

REMEMBER: Book Country Twitter chats occur every other Thursday night from 9-10 pm EST. Just use the hashtag #bookcountry to participate or follow along. Topics are announced in advance in the Book Country Discussion forums, so be sure to take a look! And follow us on Twitter @Book_Country.

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Cover Art: An Aesthetic Marketing Tool

Posted by February 2nd, 2012

Book Country Twitter Chat (January 26, 2012)

Cover design masters Irene Gallo and John Picacio share some tips and experience about the aesthetic aspect of trade publishing.

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Judging a book by its cover. We’re always told not to do it, but that’s kind of a cover’s purpose. To hook a reader, to catch an eye, to express in an external way that which is internal to the book itself. So, how do illustrators, graphic designers, photographers, and art directors do it? What makes a strong cover, and how do they take the heart of a book and put it on the cover’s sleeve, in the first place?

With a lot of hard work, creativity, and passion, for sure. That much even I know. But to give us more details, Book Country chatted with some of the top pros in the business: Irene Gallo (@IreneGallo) and John Picacio@JohnPicacio).

Irene is the creative director at Tor.com and Tor/Forge Books, one of the largerst science fiction and fantasy imprints in publishing. She is also a member of the Society of Illustrators Board of Directors AND the Spectrum Advisory Board.

John, too, is brimming with experience as one of the the most beloved and well-known cover artists in the science ficton, fantasy, and horror genres. His covers have won multiple awards MULTIPLE TIMES, as well as received numerous Hugo Award nominations for his work.

Check out some of the chat’s highlights and/or find the full transcript embedded below for your learning pleasure:

@JohnPicacio: I think the most challenging [thing] is also the most central — it’s trying to connect the book w/ its audience.

@IreneGallo: [Cover artists] need to grab the readers attention _fast_. That’s usually more about tone than detail.

@JohnPicacio: I begin by listening to the art director’s brief. Then I go read the manuscript and start breaking down the text. The reality is though (and Irene knows this all too well) — the manuscript isn’t always available to the artist.

@IreneGallo: Authors’ can often be too close the project. Fixated on too many subtleties of the book.

@JohnPicacio: [The book’s] title can have influence [on design], but I’m looking @ spirit of the book & its strengths first. Macro before micro. 🙂

@IreneGallo: Talk to [freelance designers] frankly about the revisions stage. I think self-pub gets stickiest when authors want more revisions than is sometimes called for. Keeping everyone on point is important. Marketing image,not a retelling.

If you missed the chat or want to remind yourself, we’ve posted the entire transcript as a PDF document here. The PDF will open in your browser and you’ll be able to save it to your computer if you like. You can also get to know your fellow genre fiction lovers by clicking directly on their Twitter handles.

Remember though that the chat appears from newest to oldest tweets, so start at the end of the PDF and work your way up.

Thanks to all who made this chat such a great success!

REMEMBER: Book Country Twitter chats occur every other Thursday nightfrom 9-10 pm EST. Just use the hashtag #bookcountry to participate or follow along. Topics are announced in advance in the Book Country Discussion forums, so be sure to take a look! And follow us on Twitter@Book_Country.

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The Elusive Author-Agent Relationship

Posted by January 19th, 2012

Author Laura Griffin and agent Kevan Lyon discuss how to build and maintain a strong author-agent relationship.

 twitter_newbird_boxed_blueonwhiteAlmost all writers who have publication aspirations have, at some point, queried an agent (or are planning to!). And sadly, a large number of those queries don’t get offers of representation. So when an interest agent reaches out, it’s not surprising that writers get excited and anxious to move forward. But it’s important to remember that just because you have an offer at represensentation, doesn’t mean he or she is the right agent for you. You have to be compatible with your agent on several levels and be willing to work through the bumpy patches.

What exactly are these “levels,” you ask? Just check out our January 12th, 2012 Twitter chat with author and agent team Laura Griffin(@Laura_Griff) and Kevan Lyon(@KevanLyon) to find out! They’ve been working together for five years and twelve books and have one of the strongest author-agent relationships I’ve seen. They also have some great tips regarding the best questions to ask a potential agent.

But first, a little backstory on our special guests…

Laura Griffin is a New York Times bestselling romantic suspense author. Since her first book published in 2007, Laura has been busy writing and developing her popular Tracers series, the fifth novel of which, TWISTED, comes out on April 17th. (Mark your calendars!)

Kevan Lyon is a founding partner of the Marsal Lyon Literary Agency. With a main focus on women’s fiction, romance, and young adult, she reps a number of clients and spends muchtime nurturing her relationship with each one of them. her background in book sales and distribution doesn’t hurt either!

Here’s a little preview of what our participants had to say on the topic:

@Laura_Griff: It is a bit like a marriage! Because it’s a partnership and you both have to be striving toward the same goal.

@KevanLyon: You want to try to get a feel for how they communicate, how often, how quickly. Their submission process, should you expect to hear from them during that process, how much information they share, etc.

@ColleenLindsay: Some writers are self-confident; some need a lot of handholding. An agent has to decide how comfortable they are with that.

@KevanLyon: When you recv an offer of representation make sure you are ready wi questions — make sure it feels right to you.

@Laura_Griff: Twitter and FB are great resources for [writers looking for the right agent]. Talk to other writers and hear what they think of diff agencies & publishers.

@allison_pang: Agent needs to be able to you give you the hard news as well as easy.

@KevanLyon: [The biggest mistake an author-agent can make is] not communicating honestly. I always want to hear from an author 1st if something is bothering them.

@Laura_Griff: Ask the agent what they like about your work. See if they seem sincerely excited. That’s important.

We’ve also posted the entire transcript as a PDF document here. The PDF will open in your browser and you’ll be able to save it to your computer if you like. You can also get to know your fellow genre fiction lovers by clicking directly on their Twitter handles. Please note that the chat appears from newest to oldest tweets, so start at the bottom and work your way up. Thanks to all who participated in this helpful chat!

REMEMBER: Book Country Twitter chats occur every other Thursday night from 9-10 pm EST. Just use the hashtag #bookcountry to participate or follow along. Topics are announced in advance in the Book Country Discussion forums, so be sure to take a look!

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Understanding Subsidiary Rights

Posted by December 22nd, 2011

Book Country Twitter Chat (December 15, 2011)

Literary agency masterminds Kathleen Ortiz and Tara Hart give some insight into the complicated–but important!–world of subsidiary rights.

 twitter_newbird_boxed_blueonwhiteEvery author holds a hand that s/he may not even realize s/he’s been dealt. How so, you ask? Because any project, published or not, has the potential to reach a broader audience in myriad ways through the power of subsidiary rights.

But what are subsidiary rights (AKA subrights)? What do you need to know about that? How do you use them to your advantage? We asked some of the best in the business–Kathleen Ortiz (@KOrtizzle) and Tara Hart (@Tara_Hart28)–to give us a little tutorial.

Kathleen is the subrights director at Nancy Coffey Literary and Media Representation, where she deals with a lot of foreign, audio, and digital rights. She also represents her own authors as an agent with an ever-growing list!

Tara is the contracts and permissions manager at Jean V. Naggar Literary Agency, dealing with and negotiating subrights on a daily basis. She has a Masters in Publishing from Pace University.

Take a peek at some of the highlights from our chat, and/or download the entire transcript below:

@KOrtizzle: Subsidiary rights are, in a nutshell, all rights to your book outside of a domestic, physical copy: foreign, large print, audio, film/tv, theme park, enhanced ebook, calendars, merchandise, etc.

@Tara_Hart28: [Popular genres for translation rights] depends on the territory. I hear steampunk popular in Gemran–commericial women’s fiction in Netherlands, for example.

@SarahLaPolla: There’s a difference in royalties between download & physical CD, but both rights are sold together.

@KOrtizzle: Subrights for self-pub titles = very difficult unless sales are very high. Prepare to show numbers.

@Tara_Hart28: Remember: as creators you own all rights. You chose what rights to grant based on offer.

@LiteratiCat: Mostly only extremely popular books (Twilight, Alex Rider, etc) are being “translated” into [Graphic Novel]/Manga form.

@KOrtizzle: Audio rights are  bought by audio pubs who typically want both. Just like trad pubs want [eBook] and physical.

@Tara_Hart28
: Derivative rights is defined in copyright as any derivative of the original–which can mean prequels/sequels etc. AND they can exploit those prequel/sequel rights without your involvement!

If you missed the chat or want to remind yourself, we’ve posted the entire transcript as a PDF document here. The PDF will open in your browser and you’ll be able to save it to your computer if you like. You can also get to know your fellow genre fiction lovers by clicking directly on their Twitter handles.

Bear in mind that the chat appears from newest to oldest tweets, so start on the last page of the PDF and work your way forward to the first page

Thanks to everyone who stopped by to participate!

REMEMBER: Book Country Twitter chats occur every other Thursday night from 9-10 pm EST. Just use the hashtag #bookcountry to participate or follow along. Topics are announced in advance in the Book Country Discussion forums, so be sure to take a look!

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Working with a Writing Partner/Team

Posted by December 7th, 2011

Book Country Twitter Chat (December 1, 2011)

Bestselling husband-and-wife team Ilona Andrews and editor Anne Sowards discuss the challenges of writing with a partner

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 Collaborating can be an amazing experience: you can take a project in directions you never conceived of before, you can get multiple perspectives to make a piece more relatable and realistic, you can divvy up tasks to focus your strengths, and so much more. But it can also be very difficult to work so closely with someone else in such a creative, traditionally solitary process. You won’t always see things the same way or have the same ideas of where a story should go. You might even have vastly different opinions on character motivation, for example. There are many areas where conflict could arise.


With this in mind, we decided to bring in one of the most successful writing duos today–Ilona Andrews (@Ilona_Andrews)–and Ilona’s editor–Anne Sowards (@AnneSowards)–to talk about their experiences.

Ilona Andrews is a husband and wife writing team–Ilona and Gordon. Together, they have written two New York Times bestselling urban fantasy novels, as well as a number of eBook originals.

Anne Sowards is the executive editor of the Ace/Roc imprint at Penguin Group, and works with bestselling authors like Patricia Briggs, Jim Butcher, Rachel Caine,and many more, in addition to Ilona Andrews.

Here’s a sneak peak at some of the chat’s great discussion:

@Ilona_Andrews: The idea is not to compete but rather to create the best book possible.

@AnneSowards: Both author names are listed on the contract, i.e. “author x & author y, writing as author z.”

@Ilona_Andrews: We disagree frequently on characterization, but if it’s in the final book, it is a compromise.

@AnneSowards: I would be a bit more cautious (if approached by an agent with a writing pair) because it’s a more unusual situation, but love for the book overcomes fear!

@Ilona_Andrews: I don’t think the gnre matters that much. 🙂 It’s more what each of the partners brings to the table.

@AnneSowards: [It’s a] marketing decision [to use a pen name instead of both author names]. Less confusing for readers to have one name, and [for] UF, we wanted it to be female.

@Ilona_Andrews: Writing with a partner is very similar to working with the editor.


If you missed the chat, you can view or download the entire transcript as a PDF here. It will open in your browser and you’ll be able to save it to your computer if you like. You can also get to know your fellow genre fiction lovers by clicking directly on their Twitter handles.

Please note that the chat appears from newest to oldest tweets, so start reading on the last page and work your way to the first page.

Thanks to all who took the time to share their experiences and ask questions.

REMEMBER: Book Country Twitter chats occur every other Thursday night from 9-10 pm EST. Just use the hashtag #bookcountry to participate or follow along. Topics are announced in advance in the Book Country Discussion forums, so be sure to take a look!

Follow us on Twitter for more: @Book_Country 

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What Makes a Mystery So “Cozy”?

Posted by November 23rd, 2011

Book Country Twitter Chat (November 17, 2011)

Delve into the cozy mystery subgenre–what it is, what’s expected, how to write it–with editor Faith Black and author Gayle Trent

 twitter_newbird_boxed_blueonwhiteFor some, cozy mysteries are quite the enigma. They’ve gotten more and more popular over the past several years, wrangling readers of all kinds, but many still think: but what is a cozy mystery exactly? How is it different from a general mystery? What makes it so “cozy”? Don’t most books inspire that curl-up-with-a-good-book feeling of warmth and wonder? Hmmm….curious…


The Book Country Genre Map defines cozies as “a subgenre of mystery set in a small town or village. Cozies are characterized by their lack of explicit sex and violence. The protagonist is usually a likable female sleuth who is often viewed as an annoyance by the local police. Well-known cozy writers include Donna Andrews and M.C. Beaton.”

But there’s much more to it, which is why we brought in the experts–Faith Black (@FaithBlackGirl) and Gayle Trent (@GayleTrent)–to tell us how it really is.

Editor Faith Black acquires mysteries for Berkley’s Prime Crime imprint (and much more, of course). Her vast experience in genre fiction and love of cozies is clear after even a brief chat with this awesome lady!

Gayle Trentis the bestselling author of Murder Takes the Cake, the first novel in her Daphne Martin Cake Decorating series, currently with Gallery Books. She also writes fun embroidery cozies for Berkley Books under the name Amanda Lee–The Quick and the Thread is the first in the series.

Take a look at these helpful excerpts from our chat:

 

@GayleTrent: I define cozy mystery as Desperate Housewives meets Mayberry RFD. Everyone knows everyone, but someone has a deep, dark secret!

@FaithBlackGirl: The protags [in cozies] tend to be mostly female but I would actually love to read more cozies with male protagonists.

@peachereader: We like the hobby cozy because it gives us one more thing we can relate to. Hence reading a cozy is always like coming home.

@GayleTrent: When you’ve absolutely GOT to tell someone what weird,  hilarious thing someone just did, you put it in a book with a secondary character.

@FaithBlackGirl: Some [police procedural] knowledge is definitely useful but you don’t need to go all CSI. More Miss Marple, less David Caruso.

@Chumplet: The feeling of familiary in the setting and characters make cozy mysteries easy to love.

If you missed the chat or want to remind yourself, we’ve posted the entire transcript as a PDF document here. The PDF will open in your browser and you’ll be able to save it to your computer if you like. You can also get to know your fellow genre fiction lovers by clicking directly on their Twitter handles.

Please note that the chat appears from newest to oldest tweets, so start at the bottom and work your way up.

Thanks to all who made this chat such a great success!

REMEMBER: Book Country Twitter chats occur every other Thursday night from 9-10 pm EST. Just use the hashtag #bookcountry to participate or follow along. Topics are announced in advance in the Book Country Discussion forums, so be sure to take a look!

 

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